Posted on

Food Experiment-Day 1

I always assume that everyone has a pretty good ration of food on hand at all times.  I have staples (like onions, pastas, beans, flour, etc…) in what I think is an average amount, whatever that is.  I am also only including food. Not toiletries, alcohol, etc…And am not going to figure in seasonings, or tablespoons of baking powder and such…I mention this so as not to fool myself (or you) into thinking that I am a miracle worker with the grocery dollar.  It’s my disclaimer.

First grocery trip I spent $35.06.

For dinner I made a Potato Kale soup.  Super simple, comforting on a cold winter’s night and everyone likes it.  Instead of buying a loaf of artisan bread, I made buttermilk biscuits.

1 red onion (.25 cents)

3 TBP garlic (I have a jar of minced that I want to use up)

3 Lg local organic carrots  (50 cents)

10 XL leaves Toscano Kale, organic and home grown (free)

5 Lg potatoes not organic, bought in bulk, on sale (50 cents)

pot of water, boullion cube, salt and pepper.  Total cost- $1.25

Yes, $1.25 for a hot, nutritious dinner for 5!  There were also left overs enough for 2 lunches, making the cost per meal 17 cents!  If I had used homegrown carrots, onion and potatoes…FREE MEAL!

Buttermilk drop biscuits

flour, buttermilk, baking soda, baking powder, butter, salt ($2.20)

The total cost for dinner (not including the leftovers for lunch), day 1, was $3.45, or 69 cents per person.  Can’t beat that…or can I?

 

Posted on

Food Experiment-Day 1

I always assume that everyone has a pretty good ration of food on hand at all times.  I have staples (like onions, pastas, beans, flour, etc…) in what I think is an average amount, whatever that is.  I am also only including food. Not toiletries, alcohol, etc…And am not going to figure in seasonings, or tablespoons of baking powder and such…I mention this so as not to fool myself (or you) into thinking that I am a miracle worker with the grocery dollar.  It’s my disclaimer.

First grocery trip I spent $35.06.

For dinner I made a Potato Kale soup.  Super simple, comforting on a cold winter’s night and everyone likes it.  Instead of buying a loaf of artisan bread, I made buttermilk biscuits.

1 red onion (.25 cents)

3 TBP garlic (I have a jar of minced that I want to use up)

3 Lg local organic carrots  (50 cents)

10 XL leaves Toscano Kale, organic and home grown (free)

5 Lg potatoes not organic, bought in bulk, on sale (50 cents)

pot of water, boullion cube, salt and pepper.  Total cost- $1.25

Yes, $1.25 for a hot, nutritious dinner for 5!  There were also left overs enough for 2 lunches, making the cost per meal 17 cents!  If I had used homegrown carrots, onion and potatoes…FREE MEAL!

Buttermilk drop biscuits

flour, buttermilk, baking soda, baking powder, butter, salt ($2.20)

The total cost for dinner (not including the leftovers for lunch), day 1, was $3.45, or 69 cents per person.  Can’t beat that…or can I?

 

Posted on

The March Food experiment

I’m a homebody. I want for nothing but to roam around the house and garden, working on this and that, all day long.  The only downside to this is the pay. Um, there is none.  So, as I decide that I have burned out on my current business and want to switch to full time farmer, I have to do some quick thinking to figure out how I will pay my share of the living expenses here.  If I can justify the (initial) loss of income to myself, I will feel better about jumping ship.

The first thing to do, of course, is to look at our expenses and where we can cut them. I have already done that and am on the wall about disconnecting the cable (I do love me some tv), and have moved on to our grocery bill.  I used to know exactly what I spent on groceries each month, but in the past 2 years I’ve just been buying without noticing the cost.  So I was SHOCKED when I calculated that we spend $800-1000 a month on groceries!  FAIL!

This month I am tracking every penny, every meal, every left over.  I will be the only one buying groceries, planning and cooking the meals.  I am going to see just how cheaply I can feed our family of 5 by cooking from scratch with whole, local, homegrown and organic foods.  Not in every case, of course, but primarily.  I will also consider what I am paying for items that I could be growing myself, if I was a full-time farmer.

Hopefully, by the end of the month, I can be inspired and confident enough to follow my heart.  I think I can. I think I can…

Posted on

The March Food experiment

I’m a homebody. I want for nothing but to roam around the house and garden, working on this and that, all day long.  The only downside to this is the pay. Um, there is none.  So, as I decide that I have burned out on my current business and want to switch to full time farmer, I have to do some quick thinking to figure out how I will pay my share of the living expenses here.  If I can justify the (initial) loss of income to myself, I will feel better about jumping ship.

The first thing to do, of course, is to look at our expenses and where we can cut them. I have already done that and am on the wall about disconnecting the cable (I do love me some tv), and have moved on to our grocery bill.  I used to know exactly what I spent on groceries each month, but in the past 2 years I’ve just been buying without noticing the cost.  So I was SHOCKED when I calculated that we spend $800-1000 a month on groceries!  FAIL!

This month I am tracking every penny, every meal, every left over.  I will be the only one buying groceries, planning and cooking the meals.  I am going to see just how cheaply I can feed our family of 5 by cooking from scratch with whole, local, homegrown and organic foods.  Not in every case, of course, but primarily.  I will also consider what I am paying for items that I could be growing myself, if I was a full-time farmer.

Hopefully, by the end of the month, I can be inspired and confident enough to follow my heart.  I think I can. I think I can…